7 Ways To Rid Your Home Of Plumbing Problems

7 WAYS TO RID YOUR HOME OF PLUMBING PROBLEMS

Every house has plumbing issues here and there, but calling a plumber isn’t always the best bang for your buck. Here are 7 ways to eliminate plumbing problems on your own.

1. KEEP THE AREAS UNDER YOUR SINK CLEAN.

In order to fix leaks and the damage they can do to your home, you have to notice them first. This is almost impossible if the space under your kitchen sink is home to a hardware store’s worth of cleaners, sponges, and plastic bags from grocery stores. The same goes for bathroom sinks and towels. Stop treating sink cabinets as long-term storage, and start treating them like they’re designated maintenance space. You can find convenient and dedicated storage for all the items under your sink.

2. BE VIGILANT.

If an area under your sink feels damp, then check it out. Ignoring what could be a major leak won’t do you any favors in the long run. Even worse, it could seriously damage other parts of your house.

3. TREAT YOUR EQUIPMENT WITH RESPECT.

A garbage disposal isn’t a trash can, and sinks aren’t stray hair and grease storage bins. Put those items where they belong—in the trash. If you do have to use your garbage disposal (no-one’s going to throw away 20 grains of rice or half an ounce of gristle), be sure to run hot water before, during, and after you turn it on.

4. FIXING BACKED UP SINK DRAINS.

It’s not normal for your bathroom sink to clog or to take 10 minutes to clear after having the stopper removed.

The most likely culprit here is your P-trap. Under your sink, there’s a vertical pipe that runs from your sink to a U-shaped pipe. That U-pipe is your P-trap and that’s what you’ll most likely have to clean. Place a bucket under the drain, and remove the P-trap (they’re almost always screw on). Clean the interior of the P-Trap with a wire brush and run some hot water through it. Check the drain itself and other pipes to see if there’s any easy to clean debris (taking care not to remove said pipes). When you’re finished, reconnect the P-Trap, tighten both ends, and run some water through it to make sure there aren’t any leaks.

After you’re done cleaning out the traps, you may want to consider buying some drain filters. They’re cheap, catch a lot more junk, and will save you some time. As an added bonus, you can also use these for showers and bathtubs. Just be sure to replace them as needed.

5. RUNNING TOILET.

A toilet that keeps running long after it’s been flushed isn’t just annoying, it’s expensive. As a matter of fact, this type of problem toilet can waste nearly 100 gallons a day. Typically, there are three common culprits: the tank flap, faulty float position, or a defective refill valve. You can check for online tutorials to diagnose and fix any of these problems. The parts are cheap and the process itself is easy. I had literally just fixed a faulty float not five minutes before writing this article.

6. DRIPPING FAUCETS.

Fixing a dripping faucet is a little bit more delicate work than turning a screw on a float assembly, but it’s still within the realm of most DIYers. The main issue here is that the assemblies themselves are a bit smaller and more intricate than a simple toilet mechanism. Delta and all other manufacturers have published diagnostic and repair guides on their respective websites. Take a look and decide if you think you can pull it off. If not, seek help from an expert.

7. CALL A PROFESSIONAL.

Most of the projects we’ve listed are things that most people can do with a little bit of time, research, and effort. That being said, the majority of your plumbing system is under the house or in the walls, and as a result, is invisible to you. While the fixes we’ve talked about here are fairly simple, there’s a reason calling a plumber can be mildly expensive: they know what they’re doing. Scheduling an inspection of your plumbing system can’t hurt, and if you’re uncomfortable about a diagnosis, then shop around. You may ever want to check out all those consumer services websites to make sure you’re not being taken for a ride.